Hopper Light

I’ve always loved the way that light was seen, and depicted, by the American painter Edward Hopper (1882-1967). Sometimes, as I’m out and about in an urban setting, I find instances where life imitates his art. In particular, the ubiquitous stucco walls in my area of San Francisco are a perfect surface for the flat planes of light I see in his work, and the diffusing ocean mist also doesn’t hurt. Here are three images, unabashed homages, that I’ve made over the years: “Hopper Morning,” “Apartments at Sunset,” and “Night Entrance.”



Foggy Karenina

It is a truth universally acknowledged — in both the best of times and the worst of times — that while all sunny photographs are alike, each foggy photograph is foggy in its own way.

Okay, overstatement. But I did manage to work in references to three of the great opening lines in literature. (For more, consider this article in The Telegraph).

In the next few days I’ll be showcasing varieties of fog — most from recent work. First: Noir Fog, from a night along Judah Street in San Francisco.